Reviving An Old Project

  A book can get shelved before it’s finished, but not in the good way. Creative work can get pushed to the bottom of the to-do list when priorities shift or you lose interest for the latest shiny new idea. This doesn’t...

Continue reading →

Book Tag – Reader Problems

Readers vary in style and opinion; just saying you’re a bookworm doesn’t narrow down your habits any. I’m of the opinion that, just like anything, people can love books in as ways as individual as they are in this...

Continue reading →

Australian Druidry: Connecting with the Sacred Landscape by Julie Brett

I’ll admit, when I saw this title I believed it was a contradiction in terms. Maybe not a direct contradiction, but when I hear “druid” I think of pre-Christian western Europeans, not Australia. Some of the most cherished seasonal celebrations...

Continue reading →

POV: Writing the Bystander Viewpoint

Using the term “Main Character (MC)” is sticky when your story is told through the viewpoint of a bystander. Who’s the "MC" when you have a viewpoint character who is telling the story but isn’t the main actor? Well, that’s...

Continue reading →

Holding Space: On Loving, Dying, and Letting Go by Amy Wright Glenn

If you’re going to read nonfiction, do it with purpose. Holding Space drew my attention for a personal and pressing reason. My father is fighting cancer. He will never stop fighting it, such is the diagnosis. This one will...

Continue reading →

The Creative Tribe: A powerful tool with a double-edge

I’ve recently taken a step back from my creative tribe. Still a card-carrying member (and officer in a few groups), but, after noticing unsavory patterns, I’ve had to reevaluate my expectations and dial down participation. Thanks to social media, the...

Continue reading →

The Cliffs of Insanity

I had high hopes for this month’s reading list. The Book Owls sent in their recommendations. I even bought one of the books new, which I rarely do, because I was excited (no spoilers, I’m reading it next month). I will...

Continue reading →

Writing Living Histories: The Memory Book

I believed my family was close. I grew up with both parents in the home and two brothers, near my mother’s parents who lived a few miles away. We talked about family history regularly. It wasn’t until I took...

Continue reading →

The Sandlot Principle: Which Team Are You?

On a sticky summer day, two teams shouted each other down on a scrubby sand lot. Insults flew between the little league pitcher in uniform and the scrappy catcher in shorts. The catcher had enough. His face flushed red, his eyes...

Continue reading →

Reading American History: A lesson in intention

I began this month reading about the American frontier. I realize my selections were about intention. The whole regional approach, focusing on the Southwest, shattered when I realized I had assumed the book I bought on Native American art and...

Continue reading →